Jump to content

Learn New Animals!


 Share

Recommended Posts

A sort of educational thread but since it could potentially get quite long I figure it best fits as a form of game.

The purpose is to educate others on various obscure animals that aren't often spoken or heard of! Here's a general template but you don't have to follow it...

 

Common Name:

Lifespan:

Class:

Conservation Status:

Main Area of Distribution:

Appearance Description:

Fun Fact:

 

Naturally, I will start us off with an example...

Common Name: Sarcosuchus (meaning 'flesh crocodile')

Lifespan: Unknown

Class: Reptilia

Conservation Status: Extinct, ~133–112 Ma

Main Area of Distribution: Fossils found in Niger, and Brazil

Appearance Description: A large crocodylian that grew up to 9 metres (30ft) long! They also have a snout similar to that of a Gharial, however unlike Gharials this feature is present in both males and females.

Fun Fact: Its snout makes up 75% of the skull!

[ATTACH type=full" width="190px]5104[/ATTACH]

Ghost-Dragonkin | Snakehearted

I am immortal until proven otherwise.

I use tone tags!

Untitled_06-21-2022_06-58-38.gif

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've heard and seen a lot about North American opossums, but I've never seen anyone talk about their Central/South American semi aquatic relatives, the water opossum! Unlike other marsupials, both male and female water opossums have pouches. They live in burrows along the banks of waterways, emerging at night to feed on various fishes, crustaceans, and other aquatic animals.

 

tumblr_ovcttlhcKP1uvq9elo7_500.jpg

 

Check out those hands! Perfect for grabbing little creatures to nibble on. Their back feet are webbed and their fur is water repellent, so water opossums can navigate rivers and streams pretty easily. To keep their young dry, water opossum pouches close up tightly when they dive. Another name for the water opossum is the yapok. They are certainly funky looking critters, but very cool in my opinion.

"Wholly wounded, I imitate, I take shape."

polymorphic

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've heard and seen a lot about North American opossums, but I've never seen anyone talk about their Central/South American semi aquatic relatives, the water opossum! Unlike other marsupials, both male and female water opossums have pouches. They live in burrows along the banks of waterways, emerging at night to feed on various fishes, crustaceans, and other aquatic animals.

 

tumblr_ovcttlhcKP1uvq9elo7_500.jpg

 

Check out those hands! Perfect for grabbing little creatures to nibble on. Their back feet are webbed and their fur is water repellent, so water opossums can navigate rivers and streams pretty easily. To keep their young dry, water opossum pouches close up tightly when they dive. Another name for the water opossum is the yapok. They are certainly funky looking critters, but very cool in my opinion.

I do appreciate reading about creatures such as this. When one thinks "furred animal" it's definitely not usually associated with webbed feet!

 

Common Name: Philippine sailfin lizard, also called a Hydrosaurus

Lifespan: 8-12 Years

Class: Reptilia

Conservation Status: Vulnerable

Main Area of Distribution: Philippines

Appearance Description: This species of lizard has a unique characteristic being its crest or sailfin, which is an upright part of its body that occurs from the base of the tail to the lower area of the back. This crest or sailfin is used not only to help with its ability to swim efficiently within water, but is also thought to assist with the lizard’s ability to do territorial displays and heat/cool in different environments. (Copied from Wikipedia cause I'm lazy)

Fun Fact: The eggs then eventually become hatchlings during the rainy season, which actually are born with a natural swiftness and agility that allows them to evade their predators by running across the water unlike adult lizards that swim. (Another wiki copy)

[ATTACH type=full]5105[/ATTACH]

Ghost-Dragonkin | Snakehearted

I am immortal until proven otherwise.

I use tone tags!

Untitled_06-21-2022_06-58-38.gif

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Common Name: Amphimachairodus ("Dagger-tooth", derived from Greek.)

Species: Amphimachairodus kabir ("Large dagger-tooth", derived from Arabic and Greek.)

Lifespan: Unknown

Class: Mammalia

Conservation Status: Extinct, 11.6 Ma - 126,000 BP

Main Area of Distribution: Africa, Asia, Europe, remains distributed in Djurab, Chad, Africa.

Appearance Description: Broad-bladed and relatively short-toothed sabertooth Machairodont with distinctly elongated, narrow skull, with a rough body mass in excess of 350 kg, length of 2 m, and height of 1.2 m.

Fun Fact: Members of Amphimachairodus are among the running for the largest known cats to have ever existed, competing only with Machairodus horribillis, Machairodus lahayishupup, Smilodon populator, and Xenosmilus hodsonae in terms of size and mass.

Smilodon Populator

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Common Name: Brooding Anemone (Epiactis prolifera)

Lifespan: ?? (I can't find a source on this, and looking up anemones in general wasn't helpful as I found a range from 2 years to 60 years to literally forever)

Class: Hexacorallia

Conservation Status: Again sources are really not helping on this one

Main Area of Distribution: Northeast Pacific

Appearance Description: huge picture

Fun Fact: They can move on their own, and sometimes attach to hermit crabs.

S P L A T
Link to comment
Share on other sites

One of my favorite fishes is the halosaur (from Halosaurus - "sea lizard"). They are benthic fish, which means they mostly travel and sit along the ocean floor. They are also quite elusive, as there have only been a small number of encounters with live specimens.

 

Halosaur_%2848976447277%29.jpg

 

Their long, elegant tail is my favorite part of them; said tails can grow back if they are removed, much like some lizard species.. They lack a swim bladder, and move by undulating in a similar fashion to snakes. Despite limited contact, it is believed that halosaurs can be found worldwide. They are thought to mostly eat invertebrates that also live on the sea floor, with maybe some fish and other small organisms. There are around 17 species of halosaur, including the abyssal halosaur, which can grow up to 3ft in legnth.

"Wholly wounded, I imitate, I take shape."

polymorphic

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Common Name: Common Nighthawk

Lifespan: 4-5 years

Class: Aves

Conservation Status: Least Concern

Main Area of Distribution: Across most of North America, but population depends on food availability and quantity, and how much flat land there is as these birds nest on flat ground, loam or gravel roofs.

Appearance Description: [ATTACH type=full]5107[/ATTACH]

[ATTACH type=full]5108[/ATTACH]

Dark brown and black mottled camouflage feather patterning, with white barring on the tips of the wings and tip of the tail.

Fun Fact: They are also called Nightjars, or, apparently, bullbats.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Common Name: Common Nighthawk

Lifespan: 4-5 years

Class: Aves

Conservation Status: Least Concern

Main Area of Distribution: Across most of North America, but population depends on food availability and quantity, and how much flat land there is as these birds nest on flat ground, loam or gravel roofs.

Appearance Description: [ATTACH type=full" alt="Common_Nighthawk_(14428313550).jpg]5107[/ATTACH]

[ATTACH type=full" alt="Common_Nighthawk2.JPG]5108[/ATTACH]

Dark brown and black mottled camouflage feather patterning, with white barring on the tips of the wings and tip of the tail.

Fun Fact: They are also called Nightjars, or, apparently, bullbats.

I actually saw a nightjar once. I love birds and I use a bird identification app whenever I see a particular bird for the first time. Anyway, it was hanging out in the top back corner of my grandmother’s carport. It seemed to be waiting for insects being attracted by the porch light to fly by for it to eat. I was surprised to see that little bird, just perched in a corner, waiting for its food to fly by it.

[automerge]1644183220[/automerge]

Common name: Saiga (aka Saiga antelope)

 

Lifespan: 6 to 10 years

 

Class: Mammalia

 

Conservation Status: Critically Endangered

 

Main area of distribution: Currently Russia, Kazakhstan, western Mongolia, and migrates to Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan; Historically also China and southwestern Mongolia

 

Appearance description:

 

(It’s difficult to describe, so here’s a photo from the Wikipedia article, instead.)

 

[ATTACH type=full]5109[/ATTACH]

 

Fun fact: It uses its unique nose to filter out dust kicked up by its herd and to cool its blood, during summer migrations.

 

Sources: Animalspot.net and Wikipedia

Edited by AncientEcleticChimeras
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Common Name: binturong AKA bearcat

Lifespan: between 10 and 15 years

Class: mammalia

Conservation Status: vulnerable (population decreasing)

Main Area of Distribution: rainforests of southeast asia

Appearance Description: looks kindof like a cross between a bear and cat.

Fun Fact: I learned about this animal after buying a plush toy version of it.

[ATTACH type=full]5117[/ATTACH]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Common Name: Vancouver Costal Island Wolf ( or sea wolf or costal wolf)

Lifespan: around 14 years I beleive, little is known about the species but i think thats it.

Class: mamallia ( canis lupis)

Conservation Status: Very low population (150-250) left but not put on the endangered list which I am trying to help fix

Main Area of Distribution: Vancouver Island

Appearance Description: Similar to a grey wolf but larger and a bit colour differents.

Fun Fact: Most of their diet is seafood and they can swim far from island to island.

[ATTACH type=full]5118[/ATTACH]

(he/they/it) Part of a system. Mainly just Jay on here

Costal wolf, Australian Shepard doggo, water dragon, dhole, and a grey/costal fox. Cat-hearted. Questioning demon.

minor - Age and pet regressor - autistic - I know lots so dm if u need help <3

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Common Name: binturong AKA bearcat

Lifespan: between 10 and 15 years

Class: mammalia

Conservation Status: vulnerable (population decreasing)

Main Area of Distribution: rainforests of southeast asia

Appearance Description: looks kindof like a cross between a bear and cat.

Fun Fact: I learned about this animal after buying a plush toy version of it.

[ATTACH type=full" alt="1645060009856.png]5117[/ATTACH]

I saw one of these at a little zoo once. That was the first time I had ever even heard of the binturong. Also, the literal translation of the Chinese word for the Giant Panda is bear cat, which kind of makes sense because pandas are bears that kind of resemble a fluffy tuxedo cat.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Behold the Mangapinna squid. It lives in the deep sea and has only been photographed a handful of times. Scientists don't really know anything about them. For some reason, I find this squid to be really creepy. I don't know why, because other squids don't scare me.

 

Cosmic Death Dragon // Arrow of Bast
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...