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Fallen angels vs Demons


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I am doing research and I couldn’t find a good answer. What’s the difference between fallen angels and demons? So I thought who better to ask then those who were once/are a fallen angel or demon. Sorry if this question is in the wrong forum.

-Gabriel//Kirby

Median/Dreamway system

Donnie&Leo (Fictive) Kirby (faekin//polymorph//clown) Dib (fictive) Raemus (werewolf) Gabriel (angel)

Polyamorous // Aro Ace // System // Immersive Daydreamer // Roleplayer // Dm's open

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While not an angel or a demon myself, I am a spirit medium and have worked and studied in those realms.

 

You can imagine terms like angel and demon to be more job descriptions than labels of them as a being. For example, when you enter a Starbucks you see many Starbucks employees (read: angels/demons), however, you have one person making the drinks (one kind of angel/demon), one taking orders (another kind), one manning the drive-through (another), so on and so forth. While everyone is there working for the company (in this case, serving a divine presence or order), they are not all the same. The difference between angels and demons themselves is what company they work for. In this analogy, Starbucks employees are angels and Dunkin Donuts employees are demons (even tho Dunkin is superior but hey--).

 

A fallen angel is an angel that defied the will of god or otherwise failed in their duties to god and had since been cast out of heaven. Or in our little scenario, they got fired. Now, when a fallen angel is "fired", just like regular humans, we don't instantly find another job nor do we instantly go to work for our old company's competitors. However, some might be spiteful towards their old boss and go to work for the competitor, or in this case be hired by Dunkin Donuts.

 

So, to answer your question, fallen angels are not inherently demons, however, some might join demons.

 

This is, of course, looking at it from the strict Abhrahamic version of angels and demons when in reality there are so many kinds of demons and so many different kinds of angels, all working for their own "companies" from different pantheons, religions, etc. A fallen angel might take up a position as an earthly guardian and protect the land, while others might reincarnate into human life to help humanity, maybe some might even try to restore their angelic status. It depends on the fallen angel.

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Polymorph | Chaote | Draconic Witch | Norse Pagan

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This question goes a bit deeper than the surface, because the concepts of angelic hosts and demons operates differently depending upon just what mythology one is pursuing it under. I myself am no demonologist and have little interest in diablery, and what historical evocation I do know of I am hardly versed in, but this much I can convey below. Bear in mind, this is largely from an academic, read as scholarly tradition, as I am not only not a practitioner of these interpretations I so too do not have any direct connections to them so I cannot claim to experience them aside from anecdotal encounters with beings who I could only recount as "pure, unadulterated evil" and abstract beings who were difficult to comprehend (thus much more similar to how angels appear in the ancient beliefs versus more modern ones).

 

For example of this, some include beings who are neither angel nor demon, such as the jinn in Islam, are often mistaken for either or, but are distinctly from their source a third form of being. A similar yet more conceptual example familiar to most Westerners is the way demons are portrayed in more orthodox Christian sects as say, classical Catholicism wherein they are invented to have say, hooves, horns, wings and so on, among other traditionally "pagan" features which were specifically demonized for the point of conversion (although in Judaism this is even more historic since the Tanakh references them this way, albeit to more observant ends than for the purpose of inducing pagans to convert). If we, however, look back to Judaism where the classical concept of angels and fallen angels alike - although "fallen angel" is by no means even a Hebrew word or term, not appearing in the crux of the canon in the Torah or Tanakh, instead only appearing vaguely in the Book of Enoch - come from, the only real canonical origins are those legions who left with Satan when he refused to bow before man and thus sinned against God. Samael and Satan, for some equally classical clarification, are not the same entity in their origins either and this is one of the few exceptions, where "Satan" is often portrayed as "the Devil" among others, so this will also open up more questions than answers.

 

Regardless, Christian theology equates there generally as no difference between fallen angels and demons. Judaism makes some loose distinction among them as the shedim and the se'irim. But what roles they play from there depends utterly on the sect of Judaism. Islam, the two groups of shayatin and div, in contrast, sees them as arguably only confronting Allah because they, in all their near infinite wisdom know that mankind will destroy all of creation and thus shirk from Allah who knows his creation. Iblis in his self-appointed (if not rightful) superiority sins by boasting how much better than man is - who other beliefs here would see as Satan - and as such is then punished for disobedience, but it is not clear if Iblis is jinn or angel still.

 

In Persian and even Indian proto-contemporary religions, ahura and asura respectively were not originally demons in themselves either. With time this changed and both of said entities could be equated to beings who "fell" from what most of us would understand as cosmic grace. As time transitions again, their original neutrality, then abject and object evil state is revoked from them and they fill a more complex cosmological role; little more can I say to know beyond that. With the Persian iteration, it is probable that this is the source of how Christianity and Islam alike came to know demons as portrayed, most likely sourced from Zoroastrianism, which both borrow tremendously from in major thematical elements of mythos.

 

This means the answer is simply, "Which canon is one pursuing or familiar to or believes in?" As I have no doubt there are countless more orchestrations. The simplest being that for the majority of the Western world's thought, they are one in the same, with fallen angels being more specifically those who existed before man left the Garden, who then became demons, then demons who appear from there into now with no further angels falling (that are treated as canon, at least).

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This question goes a bit deeper than the surface, because the concepts of angelic hosts and demons operates differently depending upon just what mythology one is pursuing it under. I myself am no demonologist and have little interest in diablery, and what historical evocation I do know of I am hardly versed in, but this much I can convey below. Bear in mind, this is largely from an academic, read as scholarly tradition, as I am not only not a practitioner of these interpretations I so too do not have any direct connections to them so I cannot claim to experience them aside from anecdotal encounters with beings who I could only recount as "pure, unadulterated evil" and abstract beings who were difficult to comprehend (thus much more similar to how angels appear in the ancient beliefs versus more modern ones).

 

For example of this, some include beings who are neither angel nor demon, such as the jinn in Islam, are often mistaken for either or, but are distinctly from their source a third form of being. A similar yet more conceptual example familiar to most Westerners is the way demons are portrayed in more orthodox Christian sects as say, classical Catholicism wherein they are invented to have say, hooves, horns, wings and so on, among other traditionally "pagan" features which were specifically demonized for the point of conversion (although in Judaism this is even more historic since the Tanakh references them this way, albeit to more observant ends than for the purpose of inducing pagans to convert). If we, however, look back to Judaism where the classical concept of angels and fallen angels alike - although "fallen angel" is by no means even a Hebrew word or term, not appearing in the crux of the canon in the Torah or Tanakh, instead only appearing vaguely in the Book of Enoch - come from, the only real canonical origins are those legions who left with Satan when he refused to bow before man and thus sinned against God. Samael and Satan, for some equally classical clarification, are not the same entity in their origins either and this is one of the few exceptions, where "Satan" is often portrayed as "the Devil" among others, so this will also open up more questions than answers.

 

Regardless, Christian theology equates there generally as no difference between fallen angels and demons. Judaism makes some loose distinction among them as the shedim and the se'irim. But what roles they play from there depends utterly on the sect of Judaism. Islam, the two groups of shayatin and div, in contrast, sees them as arguably only confronting Allah because they, in all their near infinite wisdom know that mankind will destroy all of creation and thus shirk from Allah who knows his creation. Iblis in his self-appointed (if not rightful) superiority sins by boasting how much better than man is - who other beliefs here would see as Satan - and as such is then punished for disobedience, but it is not clear if Iblis is jinn or angel still.

 

In Persian and even Indian proto-contemporary religions, ahura and asura respectively were not originally demons in themselves either. With time this changed and both of said entities could be equated to beings who "fell" from what most of us would understand as cosmic grace. As time transitions again, their original neutrality, then abject and object evil state is revoked from them and they fill a more complex cosmological role; little more can I say to know beyond that. With the Persian iteration, it is probable that this is the source of how Christianity and Islam alike came to know demons as portrayed, most likely sourced from Zoroastrianism, which both borrow tremendously from in major thematical elements of mythos.

 

This means the answer is simply, "Which canon is one pursuing or familiar to or believes in?" As I have no doubt there are countless more orchestrations. The simplest being that for the majority of the Western world's thought, they are one in the same, with fallen angels being more specifically those who existed before man left the Garden, who then became demons, then demons who appear from there into now with no further angels falling (that are treated as canon, at least).

Yeah what he said

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Polymorph | Chaote | Draconic Witch | Norse Pagan

https://polymorphkin.carrd.co/

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It depends on the mythology, which part of christianity the being comes from. In my experience, demons either used to be fallen angels or came into existance as a demon. A fallen angel was an angel who, while being fallen and disgraced, still considered themself an angel. I spent millenia as a fallen angel, hovering on the edges of 'heavenly' and 'infernal', hoping that one day She'd take me back. I became a demon when i accepted myself, who i was, and the dark parts of me. I go into this in a bit more detail on my AMA thread here: https://www.kinmunity.com/threads/doing-this-again.3877/#post-41787

Hope this helps! And remember, it's different for different universes and mythologies. Don't take one point of view and apply it to all beings.

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Echo or Axe (hy/it/fey + neopronouns:

https://en.pronouns.page/@WintersTouch) and Apophis (she/fey)

Demon, Nøkk, Dragon, Kipo, African Wild Dog. Leucistic Hognose Snake Daemon.

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Thank you everyone. These are all so helpful

Median/Dreamway system

Donnie&Leo (Fictive) Kirby (faekin//polymorph//clown) Dib (fictive) Raemus (werewolf) Gabriel (angel)

Polyamorous // Aro Ace // System // Immersive Daydreamer // Roleplayer // Dm's open

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Maybe something as an addition to what was said above: For me, demonic beings are outside the devine order. This has nothing to do with good or bad in a classical way, but rather it is like acting outside a devine plan. Of course, a valid question that is left open is: Which order are they exactly outside of, as there is clearly more then one god out there.
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If I may I'd try to give a bit of a general answer.

 

Demons are usually created, born, made to be demons. Depending on what kind of course, there's a lot of different kinds.

 

While a fallen angel, by necessity was an angel who defied their higher power, or disagreed and left themselves because their morals didn't align. A fallen angel as such in a general way doesn't have to be an "evil" being (hell a demon doesn't have to be necessarily evil). So in terms of morality things are a bit muddy. Not to mention different kinds of angels, different kinds of higher powers.

 

It's easy to just think angel good, demon bad, fallen angel a mix, but it all depends on one's own moral compass. One might see angels as service to an oppressive higher power and as such not view them in a good light, fallen angels who disagree or are cast out could be beacons of freedom. Of course demons could be seen as slavers or hedonists who just wish to act out malice on others and as such angels are the guardians and fallen angels can be seen as rebels. Angels and demons aren't purely Christian either so it depends on the outlook, the culture, the mythology, lens of analysis, etc.

 

I don't know if I helped at all, but I tried to give a bit more general answer that can go beyond Christianity and good/bad binary that I often see in media or the real world. x"3

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My take on it is that Angels Fall when they deviate from their patron deity's beliefs. For example, a deity whose sphere of influence is... War, let's go with war. Well, the Angel who is about to Fall is a pacifist at heart, and when they do something that doesn't align with their deity's sphere, let's say by helping along peace agreements, they Fall. Not an evil act, necessarily, but the lack of cohesion between deity and angel is what causes the Fall. The relevance here is that Fallen Angels are, in a way, made. Demons, however, are Demons from the beginning. (with exceptions, of course. Nothing is cut and dry) It also depends, as previously mentioned, on your beliefs.

 

Tl; Dr: The difference between Demons and Fallen Angels is origin-only, in my opinion.

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But even the most dreadful night is followed by the dawn

De/It/She/They ---- Alu-Fiend, Marionette, Fox hearted

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