Jump to content

Go-Bag


 Share

Recommended Posts

A "go-bag" is defined as "a collection of items you can use in the event of an evacuation."

 

Do you have a emergency preparedness type of kit already started?

 

What essential and non-essential items would you have in your go bag?

:ahuh: OffTopix.com - General Discussion Community
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have put together a bug out bag for us several years ago, when I discovered my interest in prepping and private disaster reaction.

 

This list is typed from memory, and the last un- and repack of our bag was a few months ago, so it might not be 100% complete:

 

 

- Sturdy army backpack (no zippers, just string and buckle systems, as a broken zipper can't be easily repaired on the go)

 

- Extra gear attachment pouch for the backpack

 

- Army shoulder pouch (for food and various things that don't go in the backpack, no zippers )

 

- Medium temperature sleeping bag in compression bag

 

- Army quilt in compression bag (to add extra warmth layer to sleeping setup, if needed)

 

- Army Goretex bivy bag (water repellant and breathable, basically a tiny tent

 

- Army poncho tarp (mainly used as a top tarp for weather protection, but can be worn as poncho for weather protection)

 

- Ground sheet tarp (for under the bivy and to provide a dry sitting area during camp)

 

- Foam insulation mat (for inside the bivy )

 

- Bungee cords (for attaching rolled up insulation mat, etc. to backpack )

 

- Metal tent pegs (for bivy and tarps)

 

- Nylon string (for bivy, tarp and alternative uses)

 

- Camping cook system + 2 cartridges (I am planning to build an alcohol stove for us, so we are not dependent on manufactured cartridges and can just burn whatever burnable fluids are available )

 

- Cooking pot for 650ml + small frying pan (doubles as lid for pot)

 

- Small cooking and eating utensils

 

- Alloy drink mug (we need to buy a new one, currently have a less sturdy plastic alternative packed)

 

- Lifestraw water filter

 

- Several squeezed flat plastic bottles (for use with Lifestraw)

 

- Sturdy, waterproof, outsdoor smart phone (no sim, purely fpr GPS use)

 

- Powerbank with solar charge capability + cables

 

- Swiss army knife

 

- Folding knife

 

- Hygiene bag ( basic items, incl. tweezers, nail cutter)

 

- Small first aid bag

 

- Medicine bag ( usual painkillers mainly)

 

- Small sewing kit ( Dental floss makes great, cheap, sturdy yarn for fixing things )

 

- Several lighters and matches

 

- Multilight led headlamp (chargeable with powerbank )

 

- Set of trekking poles (for ease of walking and as poles for tarp setup )

 

- Change of underwear for 2 days

 

- Multi weather clothing like extra hoodie, sun hat, wool hat, scarf, etc. (needs to be tied to body or outside of backpack, as our backpack can't hold it )

 

- Plastic bag (for all items that need 100% protection from rain and water)

 

- Compass (ours recently broke so needs to be replaced)

 

- Small notebook and pencils + sharpener (for notes and map making)

 

- All weather candle (as back up light source )

 

- Important personal items (like backup glasses in sturdy case, phone, etc. )

 

- Dehydrated food (Ramen are light and practical, can also be eaten dry in a pinch and it's easy to add scavenged/ other dried food for variety)

 

- Power bars (for snacking on the road )

 

- Various foods that are available at bug out time (Whatever is in the fridge and will withstand several days without refrigeration or can be eaten within the first day or two to prolong rations )

 

- Kerchief (always worn around neck, has many practical uses from warmth to basic breathing protection over improvised pouch, to temporarily tieing something down quick and many more )

 

 

All bigger items are kept in either camouflage patter or, dark, subdued colors, as we prioritize not to draw attention.

And there are almost always ways to draw the attention should it be needed.

 

 

But all this equipment is useless, if you don't know how to use it. I recommend making use of the vast variety of youtube videos on outdoor survival, hiking, prepping and travel.

Also pay attention to videos made by people from the hobo and broader traveler community.

 

I recommend Hobo Shoestring on youtube for his knowledge on useful gear, camp making, survival and various anecdotes from someone who spent most his life as an outdoor train traveler.

He is an extremely friendly and wise person.

 

Also Cornelius Vango, who as a fair warning is an acquired taste.

And I would not recommend their videos to minors.

 

They are a non-binary transmasc traveler, who rebuilt and curated the Slab City library for many years and spent most of their life homeless and traveling.

They do regular videos and life streams where they talk about and share their experiences.

If you can handle their sometimes rough tone, difficult (but generally friendly) personality there is a LOT of valuable lessons to be learned.

 

 

Both of them have a lot of practical and useful wisdom and knowledge to share, but you might have to sit through a lot of content to get to those bits.

I personally don't mind that, but if you are in a rush to learn, then you can straight up search for survival and outdoor tutorials on youtube, incl. packing lists for bug out bags.

 

 

I hope this post was half way informative and helpful.

[automerge]1660683667[/automerge]

It's the time when stores around here start to put camping gear on sale.

 

So today I added a 20 liter water bladder, I had my eyes on all summer, to the bug out kit.

 

Empty it weighs almost nothing.

Incredibly useful for collecting and carrying extra water.

Though for us carrying a full 20 liters is not realistic on any greater distance on foot.

If transportation exists it's a different story though.

Also great when setting up a longer camp close to a water source.

Edited by Duumy
  • Like 1

We are the Duumy System | she/her pronouns work for all of us

System Mates Text Color Key:

Spuukiy (Ghost)*Formerly default text color* | Naki (Reptilian) | Aija (Moonelf)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am ashamed to say that I…do not. I have my bag where I can put my basic sel survival stuff if I have to leave my house in a hurry,but in case of emergencies…I don’t. Here we don’t have hurricanes, earthquakes, tsunamis, so I say I am complacent. I should change this, when I am more economically able.

80's girl so Internet communication nuances is specially lost on me // she / her / they / them // I'm like megumin //

“Explosion!” // passes out

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We really should have one but we can't afford most of the sturdy prep stuff so we just have a general evacuation plan. We live in an RV in a state that has hurricanes so we make sure everyone in our system knows what to grab in case we need to evacuate but the only actually important things in that list are toothbrush, clothes, and medication. Our dad's house is the one we go to evacuate to and he already has food stockpiled and a spare mattress.

 

At least with hurricanes there's normally weather predictions so we know if we're about to get hit, the only times we've had to evacuate on short notice was during heavy wind/rainfall and that was before we anchored our RV.

 

spacer.png
spacer.png
spacer.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We really should have one but we can't afford most of the sturdy prep stuff[...]

Money being an issue certainly makes gear collecting look like a daunting task at first.

But if you are patient and know/ learn where to look for cheap gear, then putting a solid bug out bag together is a realistic goal.

 

We are far from being wealthy ourselves. Living right at the official poverty limit for this country.

The expansive list of things in our bug out bag has been collected over several years.

Almost all of it has been acquired either second hand, on sale or for free as either gifts or found otherwise.

 

The most expensive item was the Dutch army bivy bag, which came at around 50$ second hand and without the hoop.

And it took me quite a while to acquire it, but it's very much the centerpiece of our gear so it was worth it.

 

I would recommend making a list of gear you want, with priority on basics first. (But if you find lower priority items cheap go for it!)

And then just keep your eyes open for sales (even at super markets), flea markets, garage sales, army 2nd hand stores, etc.

 

Even little money can buy you a nice knife, cooking pot, a bunch of lighters, a sturdy water bottle or whatever you might find and want.

And be open to buying "cheap" gear. Cheap as in maybe not super high end and sturdy. Even a cheap 15$ super market sale tent will keep you saver and dryer, than

having to sit in the rain without one.

 

Being on a tight budget certainly turns the collecting of a more or less "complete" bug out bag (if a real complete state even exists) into a long term project.

 

But that is ok.

 

Every piece of gear you have will help you be better prepared than having none at all.

 

Even if all you got is a knife, a 15$ tent and a blanket for a start.

 

I really hope this post didn't come off as preachy.

 

But if it did I sincerely apologize.

 

This is just one of the topics I am very enthusiastic about, as I had to deal with a survival situation in my past life and like to be prepared.

Also because I need to keep Duumy and Aija save.

 

Especially in the times we live in* being prepared gives me at least a little peace of mind.

 

 

*We live in a country close to Ukraine, and the war is affecting everything around us in alarming ways. Threat and fear of future invasion is very present here.

We are the Duumy System | she/her pronouns work for all of us

System Mates Text Color Key:

Spuukiy (Ghost)*Formerly default text color* | Naki (Reptilian) | Aija (Moonelf)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Money being an issue certainly makes gear collecting look like a daunting task at first.

But if you are patient and know/ learn where to look for cheap gear, then putting a solid bug out bag together is a realistic goal.

 

We are far from being wealthy ourselves. Living right at the official poverty limit for this country.

The expansive list of things in our bug out bag has been collected over several years.

Almost all of it has been acquired either second hand, on sale or for free as either gifts or found otherwise.

 

The most expensive item was the Dutch army bivy bag, which came at around 50$ second hand and without the hoop.

And it took me quite a while to acquire it, but it's very much the centerpiece of our gear so it was worth it.

 

I would recommend making a list of gear you want, with priority on basics first. (But if you find lower priority items cheap go for it!)

And then just keep your eyes open for sales (even at super markets), flea markets, garage sales, army 2nd hand stores, etc.

 

Even little money can buy you a nice knife, cooking pot, a bunch of lighters, a sturdy water bottle or whatever you might find and want.

And be open to buying "cheap" gear. Cheap as in maybe not super high end and sturdy. Even a cheap 15$ super market sale tent will keep you saver and dryer, than

having to sit in the rain without one.

 

Being on a tight budget certainly turns the collecting of a more or less "complete" bug out bag (if a real complete state even exists) into a long term project.

 

But that is ok.

 

Every piece of gear you have will help you be better prepared than having none at all.

 

Even if all you got is a knife, a 15$ tent and a blanket for a start.

 

I really hope this post didn't come off as preachy.

 

But if it did I sincerely apologize.

 

This is just one of the topics I am very enthusiastic about, as I had to deal with a survival situation in my past life and like to be prepared.

Also because I need to keep Duumy and Aija save.

 

Especially in the times we live in* being prepared gives me at least a little peace of mind.

 

 

*We live in a country close to Ukraine, and the war is affecting everything around us in alarming ways. Threat and fear of future invasion is very present here.

You came out really detailed,and that helps! it made decide to talk to my partner about it and see when/how/what we can do,realistically speaking in my country (South America). 💙

80's girl so Internet communication nuances is specially lost on me // she / her / they / them // I'm like megumin //

“Explosion!” // passes out

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You came out really detailed,and that helps! it made decide to talk to my partner about it and see when/how/what we can do,realistically speaking in my country (South America). 💙

Thank you for your kind words.

I wish you much success in your planning!

We are the Duumy System | she/her pronouns work for all of us

System Mates Text Color Key:

Spuukiy (Ghost)*Formerly default text color* | Naki (Reptilian) | Aija (Moonelf)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Money being an issue certainly makes gear collecting look like a daunting task at first.

But if you are patient and know/ learn where to look for cheap gear, then putting a solid bug out bag together is a realistic goal.

 

We are far from being wealthy ourselves. Living right at the official poverty limit for this country.

The expansive list of things in our bug out bag has been collected over several years.

Almost all of it has been acquired either second hand, on sale or for free as either gifts or found otherwise.

 

The most expensive item was the Dutch army bivy bag, which came at around 50$ second hand and without the hoop.

And it took me quite a while to acquire it, but it's very much the centerpiece of our gear so it was worth it.

 

I would recommend making a list of gear you want, with priority on basics first. (But if you find lower priority items cheap go for it!)

And then just keep your eyes open for sales (even at super markets), flea markets, garage sales, army 2nd hand stores, etc.

 

Even little money can buy you a nice knife, cooking pot, a bunch of lighters, a sturdy water bottle or whatever you might find and want.

And be open to buying "cheap" gear. Cheap as in maybe not super high end and sturdy. Even a cheap 15$ super market sale tent will keep you saver and dryer, than

having to sit in the rain without one.

 

Being on a tight budget certainly turns the collecting of a more or less "complete" bug out bag (if a real complete state even exists) into a long term project.

 

But that is ok.

 

Every piece of gear you have will help you be better prepared than having none at all.

 

Even if all you got is a knife, a 15$ tent and a blanket for a start.

 

I really hope this post didn't come off as preachy.

 

But if it did I sincerely apologize.

 

This is just one of the topics I am very enthusiastic about, as I had to deal with a survival situation in my past life and like to be prepared.

Also because I need to keep Duumy and Aija save.

 

Especially in the times we live in* being prepared gives me at least a little peace of mind.

 

 

*We live in a country close to Ukraine, and the war is affecting everything around us in alarming ways. Threat and fear of future invasion is very present here.

We have some small things like a flashlight, lighter, canned food, but I'll start keeping an eye out whenever I go to the thrift store!

 

You came across fine, thank you for the explanations! I'll keep all of those in mind.

 

I hope that you stay safe, that sounds like a horrible situation to be in and I wish the best for you and your system

 

spacer.png
spacer.png
spacer.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We have some small things like a flashlight, lighter, canned food, but I'll start keeping an eye out whenever I go to the thrift store!

 

You came across fine, thank you for the explanations! I'll keep all of those in mind.

 

I hope that you stay safe, that sounds like a horrible situation to be in and I wish the best for you and your system

 

Thank very much you for your kind words.

 

We truly and regrettably live in very interesting times.

 

I wish you the best of luck on your hunt for affordable gear.

We are the Duumy System | she/her pronouns work for all of us

System Mates Text Color Key:

Spuukiy (Ghost)*Formerly default text color* | Naki (Reptilian) | Aija (Moonelf)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I am ashamed to say that I…do not. I have my bag where I can put my basic sel survival stuff if I have to leave my house in a hurry,but in case of emergencies…I don’t. Here we don’t have hurricanes, earthquakes, tsunamis, so I say I am complacent. I should change this, when I am more economically able.

 

I don't have one, I've thought of making one but, it'd bother me to have items that I could be using in a bag for something specific.

 

I don't have one either. Lol. thats why I made this thread, to get some ideas. :D

:ahuh: OffTopix.com - General Discussion Community
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Today I managed to acquire a robust, quality compass for free from a family member who had found it while sorting through old possessions.

They remembered that I am always after outdoor and survival items and offered it to us.

 

Now I am finally able to replace the old broken compass in our bag.

Very satisfying.

We are the Duumy System | she/her pronouns work for all of us

System Mates Text Color Key:

Spuukiy (Ghost)*Formerly default text color* | Naki (Reptilian) | Aija (Moonelf)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...